Just a month ago, it looked like Bernie Sanders was on course to become the Democratic presidential nominee, President Trump's approval ratings had hit their highest marks ever, and the economy was soaring. What difference a few weeks can make. Joe Biden's resurrection in South Carolina and commanding wins on Super Tuesday and beyond have made the former vice president his party's presumptive nominee. But more than that, the rapid spread of the novel coronavirus, extreme self-quarantining measures and a virtual halt to life as Americans know it has disrupted the country. Businesses are in trouble, unemployment is rising and the stock market has taken a nosedive, erasing all gains made during the Trump era. Biden leading the ticket, instead of Sanders, was the first blow for Republicans, making the ties they'd hoped to make between socialism and the Democratic Party much harder. But then came the COVID-19 outbreak. The Trump administration's slow reaction to manage this health crisis has many Republicans worrying a souring environment will only further endanger already vulnerable GOP senators. One top Republican strategist described it

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